High level of tumor necrosis alpha and serum interferon gamma as risk factors for progression of vitiligo disease

  • IGAA Praharsini Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Faculty of Medicine, Udayana University, Sanglah Hospital, Bali-Indonesia
  • Nyoman Suryawati Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Faculty of Medicine, Udayana University, Sanglah Hospital, Bali-Indonesia
  • IGAA Ellis Indira Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Faculty of Medicine, Udayana University, Sanglah Hospital, Bali-Indonesia
  • Saraswati Prima Sanjiwani Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Faculty of Medicine, Udayana University, Sanglah Hospital, Bali-Indonesia
Keywords: IFN, TNF, VASI, VIDA, Vitiligo Progressivity

Abstract

Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease that causes melanocyte of dysfunction. Cytokines played an important role in the pathogenesis of vitiligo. Interferon-gamma and TNF-µ  were cytokines that induce apoptosis of melanocyte cell. The increase of cytokine levels affects the clinical course of vitiligo. The stable and progressive phase of vitiligo clinically is not easy to predict. Assessment of vitiligo stability could be used to determine treatment options, duration of therapy and prognosis. This study was a cross-sectional observational study which intended to prove high levels of TNF-? and IFN-g serum is a risk factor for vitiligo progression. The demographic, clinical, and laboratory data in active vitiligo subjects (n=30) were compared with stable vitiligo subjects   (n=40).   The relationship was analyzed with multivariate. Median of the subject age with active vitiligo was 44 years (8~60) and on the subject with stable vitiligo was 45 years (15~66). The most subjects were male (58.5%) and the most common type of vitiligo was non-segmental vitiligo (87.1%). Multivariate analysis showed a high level of TNF-µ serum increased the risk of vitiligo progressivity (Adjusted PR 390.89; CI 95 % 27.98-5460.12 ; p<0,001) and high level of IFN-g serum increased the risk of vitiligo progressivity (Adjusted PR 341.06; CI 95% 33.40-3482.26 ; p<0,001). The high level of TNF-µ and IFN-g serum as a risk factor for progression of vitiligo could be used to assess the activity of vitiligo disease. The further research about the association between TNF-µ  and IFN-g to predict the therapeutic response in vitiligo.

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Published
2018-04-23
How to Cite
Praharsini, I., Suryawati, N., Indira, I. E., & Sanjiwani, S. P. (2018). High level of tumor necrosis alpha and serum interferon gamma as risk factors for progression of vitiligo disease. International Journal of Health Sciences, 2(2), 1-8. https://doi.org/10.29332/ijhs.v2n2.109
Section
Articles